NY Times design group looking for staffers Matt 20 Feb 2006

21 comments Latest by Geof Harries

Khoi Vinh is hiring several full-time positions for the design group that he leads at the New York Times. If you’re a visual designer, information architect, or design technologist looking for a gig, you can check out the job descriptions he posted at Subtraction.

21 comments so far (Jump to latest)

Noah Winecoff 20 Feb 06

I don’t think I could handle New York winters.

Mark Webster 20 Feb 06

I have to say, I feel like NY Times is making a lot of good moves lately. They seem to be bringing on/seeking out great talent…

Geof Harries 20 Feb 06

Khol is not taking questions on the positions, so I’d like to post here.

As absurd as this sounds, will the staff be working on Mac OS X or Windows? I’d have a really hard time banging away on Windows after so many years on OS X. Despite the amazing opportunity, this would be a definite show-stopper.

Pius Uzamere 20 Feb 06

LOL, I agree with you Geof … that is absolutely absurd. But to each his own!

JF 20 Feb 06

Geof, I think that’s a very good and fair question. You have to be comfortable using the tools you’re using.

Pius Uzamere 20 Feb 06

Eh … I just realized that my post came off *much* more derisive than I meant it to be — sorry about that Geof. While I agree that it’s important to be comfortable with one’s tools, I’m just amazed that the OS would dictate whether or not you take the job. Of course, I’m someone who used to bring his personal laptop into work on most days, rather than use the company Thinkpad, so take that for what it’s worth. :)

Dan 20 Feb 06

I have the pleasure of Mac at work, and I consider it one of the best perks of my job.

I would rather work for less pay on a Mac, then take a job where I had to use Windows.

However, I would use an abacus to do web development if it meant I could work with Khoi Vinh at the NY Times.

beth 20 Feb 06

Is it just me, or does anyone else think that those jobs are poorly titled? The titles “Web Site Developer” and “Web Developer” sound the same to me, but they are clearly not the same after reading the job descriptions. I would say the “Web Site Developer” is really “Web Site Designer”. Is this a typo? Or is this an industry-standard thing that I’m just not aware of?

Geof Harries 20 Feb 06

I’ve been in this business long enough to have my favourite tools: the ones I’m most productive with, enjoy using and gain inspiration from. Whether that is software, hardware or types of people I’m surrounded by, all play their valuable part.

No matter how great the opportunity, if everyday I’d be faced with a computer I don’t like (and a computer is obviously key here) I wouldn’t dig my job as much, ultimately leading to dissatisfaction. Plain and simple.

Otherwise, this seems like a dream job. Hmmm.

Jeff L 20 Feb 06

Beth,

I thought the same exact thing about the job titles - too bad he makes it perfectly clear not to email him about the positions, or someone could probably suggest a slight change.

Kyle 20 Feb 06

Beth,

I thought the same thing. Seems to me the Web Site Developer should have a title of User Experience Designer, and that the Web Developer/HTML Coder should just be labeled Site Developer.

I’d love to apply for the I/A position, but I suppose the requirement for the Graduate degree isn’t too out of line. Though, I’ve known and worked with I/A’s that could walk circles around one’s with Master’s level studies.

As a side note, these job opps are really reinforcing that I need to learn how to use photoshop/illustrator. I can program in rails, java, dom scripting, css/xhtml, and have good experience in IA and interaction design chops, but when it comes to design, Visio is my tool of choice, and I leave the rest up to the graphic designer.

Anonymous Coward 20 Feb 06

Why does someone need a graduate degree to do IA? Jesus. WRONG PRIORITIES!

Elsie 20 Feb 06

Why does someone need a graduate degree to do IA? Jesus. WRONG PRIORITIES!

Yeah really — it’s BS. It’s BS that they want an MS when an MS is more BS than a BS ;).

Rogers 20 Feb 06

I heard that NY Times uses Linux + GIMP for photo editing/creating … in case you are interested :)

Eston Bond 20 Feb 06

I’d kill for a position on this team, and I wouldn’t care if I used Mac OS X, Windows, or an Apple IIe. This is my dream place as a Web geek and online journalism fanatic.

One day. One day.

Geof Harries 21 Feb 06

Ah, some of you just don’t get it. I suppose at one time, when I was starting out, I would have felt the same way. But when this is your chosen profession and you’ve been doing it for years, the little things matter.

Dan Boland 21 Feb 06

No matter how great the opportunity, if everyday I’d be faced with a computer I don’t like (and a computer is obviously key here) I wouldn’t dig my job as much, ultimately leading to dissatisfaction. Plain and simple.

I totally agree. Whenever I nose through job listings, any insinuation that I might have to use Windows, I’m moving on to the next listing. I like what I like and I’m not going to compromise that, especially at an OS level. Particular software, probably, but not the OS.

Slav 22 Feb 06

However, I would use an abacus to do web development if it meant I could work with Khoi Vinh at the NY Times.

Anonymous Coward 22 Feb 06

I heard they do all of their design on paper using nothing but letterpress, x-acto knives, white-out and sharpies.

Adam Michela 23 Feb 06

Geof, etc…

Like Khoi, I’m here at NYT Digital thanks to our work with The Onion. I’m happy to report, everyone here uses whatever OS/tools they want. In many cases developers are using their very own laptops as their primary work environment.

I work from my Powerbook.

Geof Harries 09 Mar 06

Adam - Thanks for following up. With your clarification above, I think most people will agree that NYT Digital is, more than ever, a dream job.

Post a comment

(Basic HTML is allowed)

NOTE: We'd rather not moderate, but off-topic, blatantly inflammatory, or otherwise inappropriate or vapid comments may be removed. Repeat offenders will be banned from commenting. Let's add value. Thank you.